Mosquito Control

mosquito

Update on Aerial Spraying for EEE - Date of Record 09/16/19 as of Noon

Date of Record - September 16, 2019

09/15 - Aerial spraying did take place last evening but not in the Town of Shrewsbury. Shrewsbury residents should anticipate that a spray may occur this evening 09/16 and continue until the entire spray area has beens completed.

Legend

Map pm

Aerial spraying will continue over a period of several evenings until all areas noted in the red border on the state map has been completed. 

All scheduled spray are tentative as it's highly dependent on weather patterns and could change at the last minute.

Please visit the Massachusetts Aerial Mosquito Spray Map at https://massnrc.org/spray-map/MidWorNorSept2019.htm.  

Note: To see exactly which parts of the map were sprayed each night, please check back on the afternoon following the spray. The map will be updated as soon as the data is available. 

It remains critically important for people in communities at critical, high and moderate risk for EEE to continue to take personal precautions against mosquito bites. These steps include using EPA-approved bug spray, wearing long sleeves and pants outdoors to reduce exposed skin, and cancelling outdoor activities in the hours from dusk to dawn when mosquitoes are most active.

For more information, please visit: https://www.mass.gov/guides/aerial-mosquito-control-summer-2019 and https://www.cmmcp.org/

All residents throughout the Commonwealth should continue to use mosquito repellent and those in high and critical risk communities should consider staying indoors during the dusk to dawn hours to reduce exposure to mosquitoes. Residents can learn more about EEE and about ways to protect themselves on DPH’s website.

Spraying for mosquitoes does not eliminate the risk of EEE transmission and the public is asked to continue to follow personal protection practices. People have an important role to play in protecting themselves and their loved ones from illnesses caused by mosquitoes. Please continue practicing the 5D's (Drain, DEET, Dawn/Dusk, Dress).

Avoid Mosquito Bites - Apply Insect Repellent when Outdoors. Use a repellent with an EPA-registered ingredient (DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide), permethrin, picaridin (KBR 3023), oil of lemon eucalyptus [p-methane 3, 8-diol (PMD)] or IR3535) according to the instructions on the product label. DEET products should not be used on infants under two months of age and should be used in concentrations of 30% or less on older children. Oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under three years of age.

Be Aware of Peak Mosquito Hours. The hours from dusk to dawn are peak biting times for many mosquitoes. Consider rescheduling outdoor activities that occur during evening or early morning in areas of high risk.

Clothing Can Help Reduce Mosquito Bites. Wearing long-sleeves, long pants and socks when outdoors will help keep mosquitoes away from your skin.

Mosquito-Proof Your Home - Drain Standing Water. Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Limit the number of places around your home for mosquitoes to breed by draining or discarding items that hold water. Check rain gutters and drains. Empty unused flowerpots and wading pools and change the water in birdbaths frequently.

Install or Repair Screens. Keep mosquitoes outside by having tightly-fitting screens on all of your windows and doors.

Protect Your Animals - Animal owners should reduce potential mosquito breeding sites on their property by eliminating standing water from containers such as buckets, tires, and wading pools – especially after heavy rains. Water troughs should be flushed out at least once a week during the summer months to reduce mosquitoes near paddock areas. Horse owners should keep horses in indoor stalls at night to reduce their risk of exposure to mosquitoes. Owners should also speak with their veterinarian about mosquito repellents approved for use in animals and vaccinations to prevent WNV and EEE. If an animal is suspected of having WNV or EEE, owners are required to report to DAR, Division of Animal Health by calling 617-626-1795 and to the Department of Public Health (DPH) by calling 617-983-6800.

For the most up-to-date information, Q&As, and downloadable fact sheets in multiple languages visit the DPH webpage https://www.mass.gov/guides/eee-in-massachusetts.

Press Release 09-10-19

EEE-prevention-handout


TENTATIVE SPRAY SCHEDULE

Central MA Mosquito Control Project (CMMCP) personnel will be in Shrewsbury to respond to resident's concerns about mosquitoes in their area on the following dates:                                   
                                                       September 17 and 24
                                                       October 1

Any of the above dates are tentative and all dates are subject to change due to weather conditions, mosquito populations, mosquito virus activity and/or special event spraying. This program will shut down when cool night temperatures become predominant in the area. A detailed notice about the spray schedule is posted on the CMMCP phone system after 3:30 p.m. each day, and it is also listed on their website at: https://cmmcp.org

PRACTICE THE 5 D'S

The Central MA Regional Public Health Alliance (CMRPHA) would like to remind residents to practice the 5 D's when it comes to mosquito safety (Dump, Drain, Dress, DEET, Dawn/Dusk):

Dump- Mosquitos spend the beginning of their lives developing in aquatic environments and they don’t mind small spaces. By periodically dumping standing water you can prevent them from growing into adults that feed on you. Standing water in old tires, plant containers, buckets and any other containers with standing water all provide a great environment for many species of mosquitoes to develop. By being vigilant in dumping these containers you are doing a lot to control mosquito populations.

Drain– Kiddy pools, water troughs, pet water dishes and birdbaths all provide an ideal environment for mosquito larva to grow. You can prevent this by regularly draining and refilling these water sources.

Dress– When you are dressing to go outdoors prepare for mosquitoes. Wear clothing that covers as much skin as possible to prevent bites. Long pants and long sleeve shirts made out of lighter materials are ideal in our hot summer climate when venturing into the great outdoors. Also consider hats with mosquito netting

DEET- Use an insect repellent that lists DEET or alternatively eucalyptus oil to prevent mosquito bites. DEET is proven to be the most effective repellent and safe for human use. Bug zappers, candles and ultra- sonic devices are not effective mosquito control measures. Save your money and invest in proven solutions like DEET based insect repellents.

Dusk/Dawn- Mosquitoes are most active during the early morning and evening hours. Try to stay indoors during these time periods and if that is not possible make sure you are dressed to prevent mosquito bites and using DEET based insect repellent.

5 Ds

Notice of Amendment to 333 CMR 13.03, Requests for Exclusion from Wide-Area Pesticide Applications



As of January 13, 2017, the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources ("Department") has implemented changes to the regulation promulgated at 333 CMR: 13.00, et. seq., specifically at 333 CMR13.03 ("Regulation"). The Regulation establishes a procedure for private property owners to exclude their property from wide-area pesticide applications. The following changes have been made to the process by which requests for exclusions must be made:

  • Exclusion request my no longer be made to a city or town clerk and must be made to the Department;
  • There is no longer a deadline by which exclusions requests can be made, they can be made at any point in time during the year;
  • Exclusion requests shall become effective fourteen (14) days from the receipt of the request;
  • All excusion requests, regardless of the date made, will expire on December 31st of the year in which it was made;
  • Requests can be made electronically or via hard copy, all information related to exclusion requests and the Regulation can be found on the Department's website at: Electronic Exclusion Request.
  • Hard copy Exclusion Requests should be directed to:
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources
251 Causeway Street, Suite 500
Boston, MA 02114
Attn:  Juan Carlos Gutierrez
Telephone:  617-626-1723